Manufacturing Myths

by Kim Shackelford 22. May 2013 10:11

        “As a growing state, Georgia hosts a thriving environment for manufacturers, which keeps us top-of-mind for companies deciding to relocate or expand,” said Georgia Department of Economic Development Commissioner Chris Cummiskey on February 12, 2013 as part of a press release about a new manufacturing company coming to Georgia. “Companies can expect to find here well-trained workers and an outstanding logistics system that gives them access to the world.”

        Impact Staffing has been staffing the manufacturing industry for over 13 years. A lot has changed in that time period, but many of the misconceptions about the industry remain the same. At a time when the governor’s office is making manufacturing a priority for economic growth, it’s time to de-bunk those myths once and for all.

 

#1 All of the manufacturing jobs have gone overseas.

 

This is simply not true. Yes, some plants have been moved to other countries, but many companies still rely on American workers to manufacture their products. In fact, the United States is still the top manufacturing country in the world.

 

In Georgia alone, there are over 350,000 people currently working in manufacturing. Not only that, but just since the beginning of 2013, the governor’s office has announced the creation of more than 2,500 new jobs at manufacturing facilities. Products manufactured in Georgia range from baked goods to carpet to digital communication technology.

 

#2 Only unskilled workers work in manufacturing.

 

Actually, the opposite is true for this one. While there are some entry-level positions that require little training, almost every manufacturing job requires a different skill set.

 

Our top employers are looking for candidates who have mechanical aptitude, a strong work ethic and work experience in manufacturing or a similar industry. A job in manufacturing can also be a great transition for military veterans into the civilian workforce.

 

Within the industry there are many different job descriptions and opportunities for advancement. We place welders, machinists, engineers, shop managers, shipping and receiving clerks, project managers, maintenance technicians, fabricators, pricing analysts and safety specialists, just to name a few.

 

#3 Manufacturing jobs have low pay rates.

 

The median annual pay rate for a welder in Georgia is $46,696.00, which is higher than the average annual income of workers in Georgia across all industries according to the 2010 census. This is true for many different skilled industrial positions.

 

While going to college is the right path for some individuals, there are other pathways to successful careers in manufacturing. Going to trade school and learning a trade such as fabrication or machining will increase earning potential. There are scholarships available to help offset the cost of training for skilled positions, such as the Georgia HOPE Grant. For more information about skilled trades and trade schools in Georgia, visit http://www.gobuildgeorgia.com/.

 

 

        So, look beyond the myths. Manufacturing in Georgia is a thriving and productive industry. Impact Staffing has connections with great companies in need of workers. Search our open positions or submit your resume today! 

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